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Remember These 10 Everyday Phrasal Verbs for Communication

Get familiar with some phrasal verbs that native speakers use often when it comes to communication.


Intransitive (no object or require another preposition to add an object)

Speak up = to speak louder

Speak up (about something) = to express your dissatisfaction with something

  • I'm having trouble hearing you. Can you please speak up? (speak louder)

  • If you don't like what your government is doing, why don't you speak up? (express dissatisfaction)

Transitive Verbs (require a noun as an object)

Get (something) across = to communicate an idea or message effectively

  • I'm not sure if I got my point across or not during the meeting.

Talk (something) over = to discuss something with someone in order to make a decision

  • I got a job offer in London. My wife and I talked it over and we decided that I should take it.

Bring (something) up = to mention something

  • She didn't bring her wedding up when I talked to her yesterday. I hope it went well.

Cut (someone) off = to interrupt someone

  • I'm sorry to cut you off but I have to answer this call. Just a moment.

Fill (someone) in (on something) = to provide someone with information that they missed

  • I missed the meeting this morning. Can you fill me in on the discussion?

Talk (someone) into (something) = to persuade someone to do something

  • I can't believe that my friend talked me into singing karaoke last night. It was so embarrassing!

Run (something) by (someone) = to share an idea, plan, or thought with someone to see what they think

  • If you have a minute, can I run an idea by you? I think it might solve our problem.

3-Word Verbs (always require 3 words to make the phrasal verb)

Get through to (someone) = to successfully get someone to agree with what you say

  • I want my son to be more active, but it's hard to get through to him.

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Practice

Try to determine what the following sentences mean:

  1. He kept cutting me off during my presentation

  2. I didn't have time to bring up the budget during our meeting

  3. I ran my proposal by my boss and she loved it.

  4. It's nice to hear from you but can you speak up a little please?

  5. I've been telling my friend to quit smoking for a long time and I think I finally got through to him.

  6. We need to start planning our trip. Do you have a few minutes now to talk it over?

  7. I'm glad that so many people are speaking up about racism in our society.

  8. I had to present my strategy to the directors. I hope that I got it across to them.

  9. My wife talked me into a cat.

  10. Thanks for filling me in on the decision.

Answers

  1. He kept interrupting me during my presentation.

  2. I didn't have time to mention the budget during our meeting

  3. I shared my proposal with my boss and she loved it.

  4. It's nice to hear from you but can you speak a little louder please?

  5. I've been telling my friend to quit smoking for a long time and I think I finally got him to agree with me.

  6. We need to start planning our trip.  Do you have a few minutes now to discuss it?

  7. I'm glad that so many people are expressing their dissatisfaction about racism in our society.

  8. I had to present my strategy to the directors. I hope that I communicated it to them effectively.

  9. My wife persuaded me to get a cat.

  10. Thanks for providing me with information about the decision that I missed.

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